May 19, 2016

Schoolhouse Review Crew: Memoria Press Logic

One of the long-term goals my husband and I have for our children's education and one of the major reasons why we homeschool our kids is giving them the ability to think and reason. We don't want them to blindly accept whatever they are told as truth. We want them to read between the lines, to think outside of the box, to be creative problem solvers. Naturally, this goal guides our curriculum choices in many ways. One of those ways is that we teach Logic as a formal subject in our school. Kaytie and Nate (who are 13 and 12 respectively) have both completed a couple of logic courses. They were casual, "simple" courses, so I was excited to be asked to review Traditional Logic I Complete Set from Memoria Press because it seemed like the logical (pun intended) next step.




Logic, Greek Myths and Astronomy Memoria Press Review


This course is intended for kids in 7th grade and up. It is a no-frills kind of thing. It comes with a consumable Student book, a Teacher Key, a book of quizzes and tests, and two instructional DVDs.

The DVDs are essentially Martin Cothran teaching the lessons. They also contain slides of the important points in a lesson, which, I think, would be a handy way to teach your child to take notes.

The bulk of the material is in the Student book. This is a soft cover, 146 page workbook written to the student. The instruction from the DVDs are also in the book. The text is broken up into short segments which is good, because there is a lot of information in there! Each day, a section or two is assigned for reading and then there are questions over the material for the student to answer. They can write their answers directly in the book. A lot of the answers are fill in the blank, matching, or True/False, but many require short answers.

The Teacher Key contains the answers to the questions in the workbook. It also has the answers for the quizzes and tests. Or maybe I should say "test", because there are 13 quizzes and a final exam.

This course is traditional formal logic, a distinction that is explained to the student (and in our case, me, the teacher, as well) right away. I took a Logic course in college, so I expected to enjoy a refresher, but this was deep. A lot more deep than I ever imagined I would find in a middle school/high school level program. In the first chapter we ran into a question that took us several minutes of breaking down each part of the sentence just so we could figure out what was being asked. Then we had to figure out the answer!

Since my kids are on the lower end of the age range for this course, we tweaked our use of it greatly. I did not require them to watch the DVD. I'll save that for later. I also did not hand them the book and walk away. I did expect them to read the passages on their own, but then we went over the questions and answers together very slowly. I didn't make them write them down, but we did them orally. There wasn't enough room for them to write the short answer questions anyway.

I think that Traditional Logic I is a good curriculum and will help me reach my goal of teaching them to think and reason. I just think that we need to wait until they are actually in high school to finish it. To see what other Crew members thought, click on the banner below!



Logic, Greek Myths and Astronomy Memoria Press Review
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